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Clava Cairns

Posted by [email protected] on October 14, 2016 at 1:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Clava Cairns is a must for anyone on a Megalithic Odyssey.

The  Prehistoric Burial Cairns of Bulnuaran of Clava are a group of three Bronze Age cairns located near Inverness. Dating back c4,000 years, they are  exceptionally well preserved and a fantastic example of the distant history of Highland Scotland,.

 

The cemetery was used in two periods. At around 2000 BC a row of large cairns was built, three of which can still be seen today. A thousand years later the cemetery was reused and new burials were placed in some of the existing cairns and three smaller monuments were built including a 'kerb cairn'.

The site is wonderful to walk around and a stone close to the entrance looks like a carved face.

Traces of a smaller cemetery can also be seen at Milton of Clava, a short distance up the valley to the west. The cairns at Balnuaran of Clava extended along a gravel terrace raised above the River Nairn.

 

Excavations unearthed evidence for farming on the site before any of these monuments were built. The settlement was directly replaced by the cairns and it even seems possible that some of the material used to build them had been taken from demolished houses.

Isbister Chambered Cairn - Tomb of Eagles

Posted by edwinswagger on June 6, 2016 at 12:00 AM Comments comments (0)

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Perched above the dramatic South Ronaldsay cliffs, the Isbister Chambered Cairn - better known today as the 'Tomb of the Eagles' - is one of Orkney's top archaeological sites. Discovered by chance by local farmer Ronnie Simison in the 1950s, the Stone Age tomb revealed an amazing collection of bones and artefacts, placed here some 5,000 years ago.

 

 

 

Roughly half a mile inland from the tomb is a Bronze Age site. It comprises a mound of burnt stone and the remains of a stone building, named after the 'Liddle' farm where Ronnie uncovered them. Excavations at the site have led to important discoveries about how people lived and worked in Orkney 3,000 years ago.

 

 

 

More than 50 years after Ronnie Simison came across these remarkable sites, his family invite you to come and enjoy these well-loved visitor attractions.

 



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